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Path to Outlook Express Files on WinXP

Trying to backup your Outlook Express .dbx files on Windows XP may prove difficult if you can’t find them. Well, fret no more, my friend. Here is the generalized path to the Outlook Express folder, which contains all of the .dbx files for a particular user. Copy, paste, and shortcut: C:\Documents and Settings\[username]\Local Settings\Application Data\Identities\{12345678-1234-ABCD-EFGH-1234567890AB}\Microsoft\Outlook Express * [username] = each user will should have their set of .dbx files. * {12345678-1234-ABCD-EFGH-1234567890AB} = represents a unique alphanumeric string. Read more »

Embed External Content via iframe and div

By using an <iframe></iframe> within a <div></div>, it is possible to include external web content in most any web document. This method serves as an excellent alternative to actual frames, which are not as flexible and definitely not as popular. Indeed, with CSS, the placement, sizing, and styling of div’s provides endless possibilities for embedding external or even internal web content into pages that would otherwise require the use of frames, Flash, or JavaScript. This method works on any modern browser, as well as any old browser that understands both <div></div> and <iframe></iframe> tags. Simply add the following code to […] Read more »

Auto-Focus Form Elements with JavaScript

After digging through the WordPress source code, I stumbled upon this very useful JavaScript method for auto-focusing form elements upon page load. Here is the JavaScript code (place within the document head): <script type=”text/javascript”> function formfocus() { document.getElementById(‘element’).focus(); } window.onload = formfocus; </script> …and corresponding (X)HTML markup (abbreviated for clarity): <form> <input id=”element” /> <input /> <input /> </form> In this example, the first form element (identified by id=”element”) will be automatically focused when the document loads, thus facilitating the process of entering data in the form. This technique would serve users well on login pages (wink, wink;), or anywhere […] Read more »

Roll your own Apache Rewrite Log

Roll your own Apache Rewrite log! Rocking your own rewrite log is super-helpful for testing .htaccess rewrite rules, WordPress permalinks, etc. For more information, check the source. Rewrite log via http.conf Twist one up via the Apache configuration file by placing this code at the foot of your http.conf (remember to edit the path): # Roll your own Rewrite log # Log details via scale of 1 to 9 # 1 = few details, 5 = enough details, 9 = too much detail RewriteEngine On RewriteLog “/absolute/path/to/your/wwwroot/public_html/rewrite.log” RewriteLogLevel 5 via htaccess ..doesn’t work. Example Here is an example indicating the […] Read more »

WordPress on Crack: Tips for Faster Post Publishing

Apparently, article posting is painfully slow on 2-ish versions of WordPress. Indeed, we finally got tired of waiting several minutes every time we published, saved, or edited a post. After a bit of research, reading through countless complaints and suggested remedies, several key methods began to emerge. And, after taking the time to implement them, we have definitely enjoyed an substantial decrease in time required to publish, save, or edit posts. Please note that everyone’s site is configured differently. These are the tricks that helped us to speed up publishing, but they may not have the same effect for everyone. […] Read more »

Add RSS Feed Link Icons to WordPress Category Listings

This brief tutorial explains two methods for adding RSS feed link icons to category listings. Let’s say that you have a list of category links, where each link targets a specific category view. Now let’s say that, next to each category link, you would like to provide a icon that links to that particular category’s syndicated feed. So, rather than cluttering up your page with two sets of category links — one for category views and another for category feeds — consolidate links and simplify your site by providing both sets of links in a logical, streamlined format. Method One: […] Read more »

Firefox CSS Magic

Consider this post an evolving receptacle for Firefox-specific CSS tricks. Change the color of highlighted text *::-moz-selection { background: #FF3C00; /* the background color of the highlight */ color: #FFF; /* the color of the text within the highlight */ } Change the opacity of an element div#division { /* choose either attribute */ -moz-opacity: 0.99; /* possible values: 0-1 */ -moz-opacity: 99%; /* possible values: 0%-99% */ } Control item selection of an element div#division { /* choose one of the following values */ -moz-user-select: none; /* no content within the element may be selected */ -moz-user-select: all; /* […] Read more »

Extreme Makeover for Gravatars in WordPress

Strategic Methods for Improving Gravatar Functionality in WordPress Gravatars have become a popular way of adding spice to the "comments" page of many WordPress-powered sites. So popular, in fact, that the gravatar server is often overloaded, bogged down with millions of gravatar requests every second. This immense server load effects user pages everywhere, resulting in slow loading times, unresolved server requests, and missing gravatars. Such broken presentations appear unprofessional, tarnish reputations, and may provoke confusion. This article provides essential solutions for an extreme gravatar makeover.. Read more »

Delete Unwanted Context Menu Items in WinXP

Within the right-click context menu is the option to create "New" file items. While the list of available documents within the "New" submenu often contains several useful file types, such as .txt or .zip, it also contains lots of unnecessary entries. To clean up the "New" right-click context menu, open the Registry Editor, regedit.exe, and Find all instances of "ShellNew". Examine the search results. Every ShellNew branch belongs to a specific type of file. As each ShellNew branch corresponds to an entry in the "New" right-click context menu, delete the ShellNew branch for each "New" file type that you would […] Read more »

Folder Background Images in WinXP

This brief tutorial explains how to add a background image to any folder in Windows XP. First, make sure all hidden files are visible on your system. Then, open the folder for which you wish to add a background image. Within the folder, right-click and select Properties » Customize tab » Customize. There, choose any icon, click Apply and OK. That process should have created a "desktop.ini" file. Open that file with a text editor and add these lines of code: [ExtShellFolderViews] {BE098140-A513-11D0-A3A4-00C04FD706EC}={BE098140-A513-11D0-A3A4-00C04FD706EC} [{BE098140-A513-11D0-A3A4-00C04FD706EC}] IconArea_Image=C:\path\folder\background.jpg To customize this according to your needs, edit the path in the last line to […] Read more »

Roll Your Own SEO Log

Introduction Search engine optimization (SEO) is the business of every serious webmaster. The process of optimizing a website for the search engines involves much more than properly constructed document headers and anchor tags. Websites are like trees: their roots are the growing collection of content presented through the branching universe of the World Wide Web. Or something. The point is that optimizing a website requires nurturing the site itself while also ensuring proper exposure to the requisite elements of the internet. The process of optimizing your first website may seem daunting. There are many aspects to consider and many websites […] Read more »

SEO 101: Keyword Development and Deployment

Keywords play a vital role in search engine optimization (SEO), and — if used properly — have the potential to increase the flow of traffic to your site. It is beneficial to maintain an active list of keywords for each of your websites. Each list should be a continually evolving set of important, relevant keywords. The idea here is to develop a consistent practice of actively seeking better keywords, thereby producing your very own customized keyword library. Read more »

Customize WordPress Quicktags

Note: This condensed tutorial assumes you are working with WordPress 2+ and are familiar with editing .php and/or .js files. WordPress quicktags1 provide shortcuts for adding certain bits of code to your posts. The default set of quicktags includes some handy shortcut buttons for tags such as <strong>, <a>, and <img>, as well as a few others. While the default set of quicktag buttons is occasionally useful, a quick bit of quicktag customization can easily transform your personal set of quicktag buttons into a deadly arsenal of time-saving code shortcuts. First, open the quicktags.js file, usually located in the wp-includes/js […] Read more »

Fun with Downlevel Conditional Comments

Ever since Internet Explorer 5 (IE5), Microsoft has included browser support for "downlevel conditional comments," a non-scripted method of browser detection. Downlevel conditional comments (DCC) are a useful tool for targeting directives to specific versions of Internet Explorer. Downlevel conditional comments consist of an opening statement and a closing statement. Taken together, the statements enclose markup, CSS, JavaScript, or any other element typically included within an (X)HTML document. The DCC may be placed anywhere within the document and executes its contents only for the version(s) of IE specified. This technique is useful for delivering IE-specific stylesheets exclusively to specific versions […] Read more »

Nifty CSS Link Hover Effect

This nifty CSS link hover effect magically reveals a hidden span of text after specified links. The trick employs an anonymous span nested within an anchor tag. CSS then acts upon the markup with a set of rules that basically says hide the nested span until the link is hovered. Here is an example. Here is the CSS code and XHTML markup that makes it happen: a:link, a:visited { text-decoration: underline; color: #990000; } a:hover, a:active { text-decoration: none; color: #990000; } li a:link span, li a:visited span { display: none; } li a:hover span, li a:active span { display: inline; } <ul> […] Read more »

Auto Clear and Restore Form Elements

Using a small bit of JavaScript, it is possible to auto-clear and restore form elements when users bring focus to them. Simply copy, paste, and modify the following code example to achieve an effect similar to this: Here is the HTML/JavaScript for your website: <input value=”Click here and this will disappear..” onfocus=”if(this.value == ‘Click here and this will disappear..’) {this.value = ”;}” onblur=”if (this.value == ”) {this.value = ‘Click here and this will disappear..';}” type=”text” size=”77″ /> Update [January 2nd, 2007] » Here is another auto-clear JavaScript trick that cleans up the (X)HTML code but does not auto-restore the element. […] Read more »

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